​​Big Huisman crane for Japan

19 October 2018

A 1,000 tonne Huisman pedestal crane is destined for Japan

A 1,000 tonne Huisman pedestal crane is destined for Japan

Japan Marine United Shipyard (JMU) has ordered a 1,000 tonne capacity crane from Dutch specialist Huisman. The pedestal mounted crane will be used for offshore wind turbine installation in Japan. It will be built at Huisman’s yard in China and installed at the JMU yard in Japan.

The latest order for Japan follows another two years ago. Huisman supplied an 800 tonne pedestal crane for the Japanese Penta-Ocean Construction company’s self elevating platform. It was also constructed by JMU and used to install offshore wind turbines.

The end clients for the latest crane vessel are Japanese construction companies Obayashi Corporation and TOA Corporation. It was the first firm order, Huisman said, since it began working with Japanese agent Exeno Yamamizu Corporation.

While the design of the crane “builds on the track record of Huisman’s previous crane for the Japanese market,” it will be adapted to suit Obayashi Corporation and TOA Corporation, Huisman said.

Timon Ligterink, Huisman sales manager, commented, “As a positive track record is highly important in the Japanese market, we are extremely happy with the continuing trust that Obayashi, TOA and JMU have expressed in Huisman. After our initial market entry in 2016, we now retain our 100 per cent market share in the region for offshore wind turbine installation cranes with this second contract. By adapting our products to our client’s needs and, living up to our promises to one of Japan’s most advanced shipyards, we establish ourselves as a reliable partner, which is key to develop this new market.”

 

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