Cofraplus 60_image300

Rendering of ArcelorMittal’s Cofraplus 60 composite flooring solution

A study has shown that a construction assessment methodology called Stelligence developed by Luxembourg-based steel manufacturer ArcelorMittal offers a number of advantages over a conventional approach to building.

Stelligence was described by the company as a science-based approach to assessing the social, environmental and economic impacts of a range of building materials and practices, and is designed to promote collaboration within the sector.

A peer-reviewed study comparing a conventionally-built eight-storey office building in Europe with an optimised building scenario developed using Stelligence concluded that the new methodology offered a number of advantages.

For instance, the building’s height and space within it were said to be optimised by the use of Angelina beams and Cofraplus 60 composite floors, resulting in around 11% savings across the façade, stairs and core elements. Offering uninterrupted spans of up to 13m, the Angelina beams make it possible to create more flexible spaces that can be reconfigured easily.

A further 39% saving was said to be made in foundations outlays by using steel foundations solutions, which are less than half the weight of equivalent structures, according to ArcelorMittal.

Impact on the environment was also said to be lowered by higher rates of recycling and the use of solutions such as Magnelis – a metallic coating that offers corrosion protection. Also, it was said that buildings using ArcelorMittal’s steel solutions were able to attain higher sustainability ratings in schemes such as BREEAM (Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method) and LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) than those built with traditional materials.

Construction costs were said to be further reduced – by up to 24% – with the use of 13m steel spans that can be erected up to twice as fast as concrete equivalents in 8 and 5m spans, said the company. In addition, site traffic is reduced by the fact that steel requires fewer site deliveries than comparable materials.

Newsletter

Delivered directly to your inbox World Construction Week features the pick of the breaking news stories, product launches, show reports and more!

Sign up for free

Newsletter

Delivered directly to your inbox World Construction Week features the pick of the breaking news stories, product launches, show reports and more!

Go to newsletters