Civils web

Coleman & Company, Delsan-AIM and Priestly Demolition will contest the Civils Demolition award

Civils Demolition

Judges: Henrik Bonnesen, Cowi, Denmark; Patrick Frye, Cardem, France; Bill Moore, ERM, USA

Coleman & Company (United Kingdom)

Project – Waterloo International Terminal

Client – Network Rail Wessex Capacity Alliance (Skanska, Colas, Mott MacDonald, AECOM)

Coleman & Company was appointed the demolition contractor of choice for Network Rail’s flagship, £600 million (US $776 million) development of Waterloo International Terminal in London, United Kingdom. The live station provides transport and connections throughout London, the UK and Europe, with a footfall of 200,000 passengers each day.

Delsan-AIM (Canada)

Project – CN Tunnel Dismantlement

Client – KPH Turcot

Dismantlement occurred within the right-of-way of an important CN transportation corridor with four railway tracks remaining in use during the project. The work was performed in accordance with detailed engineering procedures, closely coordinated with CN operations in order to protect existing infrastructures, while maintaining train traffic and ensuring the safety of all personnel.

Priestly Demolition (Canada)

Project – Port Severn Bridge Demolition

Client – Looby Construction

Priestly Demolition was contracted by Looby Construction to demolish two highway 400 bridge structures over the Trent Severn waterway. The bridge construction consisted of one 88 m (290 ft) by two-lane bridge with concrete encased steel truss arches with a concrete deck. The second bridge was a 30 m (100 ft) long two-lane wide poured in place concrete bridge.

Explosive Demolition

Judges: Dan Costello, Costello Dismantling, USA; Clinton Dick, Liberty Industrial, Australia; John Woodward, C&D Consultancy, UK

Cardem (France)

Explosive web

Companies from France, South Africa and the United Kingdom go head to head in the Explosive Demolition category

Cardem performed an explosive demolition of a 115-apartment building in a very dense urban environment with strong societal constraints. It had to adapt to these strong constraints in term of noise, dust and concrete projection reduction. The proximity of a school and another apartment building led Cardem to realise an explosive demolition with directed fall. This demolition needed more than six months of preparation before the blasting day.

Jet Demolition (South Africa)

Situated on less than 0.2 hectares (0.5 acres) in a densely occupied urban environment, the 15-storey H G de Witt Building’s exceedingly tight site made it necessary to produce a centre-drop implosion action that would emphatically pull the east end of the building and thereby “ride” it to the west, while simultaneously pulling in the west end of the building.

Safedem (United Kingdom)

The Belville Street tower block had previously been labelled a structure “too difficult to demolish”. Not because of the structure itself, but more due to what was surrounding it …the risks had been deemed too great. The 19-storey tower block sat perched upon a cliff top, with the electrified west coast main line located at the bottom of the cliff. The risk of debris falling down nearly 40 m (130 ft) and causing mass destruction of Network Rail’s assets was an issue that had the client, River Clyde Homes, scratching its head.

The World Demolition Awards are part of the World Demolition Summit, which takes place in London, UK on Thursday November 2. The event is organised by Demolition & Recycling International in co-operation with the European Demolition Association and with the support of the National Demolition Association of the USA. The headline sponsor is Volvo Construction Equipment.

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