Get your company in the IC50

In contrast to the 2019 IC50 of the world’s largest crane-owning companies things have increased much more positively over the last year, giving it a strong boost, writes Alex Dahm.

One thing the coronavirus Covid-19 has had little impact on is the 2020 IC50. It could be deemed one benefit of being something relatively slow-moving. While next year’s ranking may be a different story, let’s concentrate on this one and its positives.

An increase in the IC50 top 100 IC Index (see box: Notes for the IC50) total of 4.72 per cent puts it back up there as a typical year’s healthy increase and much better than last year’s 1 %. The growth has been such that this year’s top 100 total Index is approaching the total of all the 200-odd entries in 2019 and exceeded that same total of 2018.

The number of entries – 210 – is also up this year, from 201 in 2019, even accounting for the fact that 19 companies were removed. Three of those were sold, one was closed and the remainder were just old data. More than replacing them are 23 new entries, nine of them in the top 100. It should be noted that some of the new entries are actually returning companies that have been in the table before and have now provided new data.

Some of the new or returning entries include Marmon, TopKran, Johnson Arabia, Custom Truck and Ohya Corp. It is always good to see entries from under-represented countries or regions, for example, Russia, Japan and the Middle East.

Without further ado, however, it is time to announce the order of things this year. At the top of the table is yes, you guessed it, Mammoet.

Not only is it there the same as it has always been since the beginning of the IC50 in 1995, it has massively consolidated its position by adding ALE. Dutch international heavy lift specialist Mammoet completed the acquisition of fellow international heavy lifting and transport specialist ALE, on 8 January 2020. Since then the businesses has operated as one company under the Mammoet brand.

Mammoet has the highest IC Index value, the most employees and the most depots. In terms of numbers of wheeled cranes it is in the top 10, at 5th place and similarly for the number of lattice cranes, it is in the top 10, at 7th place. Where it scores is in the size and capability of the equipment – fewer but larger cranes.

Last year number two Sarens was catching up fast with Mammoet but that has all changed in light of the above. Much of the Sarens growth last year was from the addition of just one crane, the 5,000 tonne capacity SGC 250, adding 250,000 tonne-metres to its Index total. Adding ALE’s fleet to the Mammoet one now sees a gap approaching the size of the entire Lampson fleet.

Big yellow crawler crane extreme rear three quarter angle view up the boom and black counterweight slabs in your face

Buckner in the USA moved up two places in the top 10

Increases were clear across the board in the top 100, mostly like the Index total, in the order of 4 %. The number of wheeled mobile cranes was up 4.45 % to 27,353 units and the number of lattice boom cranes was up 4.84 % to 7,041 units. The number of employees was up 4.52 % to 81,984 and even the number of depots, in decline for the last two years, was up, by 3.06 %, to 1,514.

Looking at the top 20 companies, the pattern was similar but the increases were even higher percentages. The number of depots was up in double digits – 11.92 % – to 566 from 507 in 2019, which itself was just a 2 % increase on 2018. Employees were up 7.92 % or more than 2,000 people to a total of 32,871. In 2019 they were down more than 4 %. In terms of cranes, wheeled mobiles were up by 5.53 % or 582 units, compared to a 4 % decline the year before. Lattice cranes were up by 161 units or 4.09 %, to 4,101.

Numbers were up in the top ten fleets carrying the most wheeled mobile and the most lattice cranes. This year showed a 7.27 % (or 773 units), increase to a total of 11,413. More than three times the 2 % or 209 unit increase last year. After many years of increases in the number of lattice boom cranes, last year’s decline (albeit by just three units) in the total has been reversed and this year is an increase of 1.39 %, or 46 units, the biggest rise since 2017.

Composition of the top 10 this year has changed more than usual. Third place has been vacated by ALE as its fleet is now with Mammoet, allowing Maxim to move up a place from fourth. Lampson and Sangvi similarly move up a place to fourth and fifth, respectively. Buckner now in sixth has moved up two places from 8th, jumping ahead of Bigge, still at 7th. All Erection at 8th has entered the top 10 from 11th. A five place jump from 14th for BMS see the Danish company also move into the top ten. Rounding out the top ten is Deep South Crane & Rigging, down one place from 9th.

 

BKL Grove GMK6400 placing the lid of a large round industrial water heater with a miserable grey sky background

BKL at work in Germany. Photo: Boris Golz Fotografie GmbH

The Basket of Eight

In 2017 it was planned to create a new group of ten for 2018 but, because the fleets of the two acquired companies in the sample were retained by another in the group, the eight were retained. The companies in the group are as follows: Mammoet, Sarens, Lampson, Sanghvi Movers, All Erection, Tat Hong, Al Jaber and Maxim, which includes the assets of Essex and AmQuip, following their acquisition in September 2016 and April 2017, respectively.

For the first time the total IC Index value of the 2020 Basket of Eight, at 12,798,518, is more than double (103 %) up on the (6,294,798) total of the first one in 2009. This year it was up 11 % on the 11,521,564 total of 2019.

 

IC50 2020

IC50 2020

 

Notes for the IC50

Companies are ranked by their IC Index, calculated as the total maximum load moment rating, in tonne-metres, of all cranes in a fleet. All companies in the list, plus other prospective ones, have the opportunity to supply fleet information and the other requested data for inclusion in the ranking. Where companies supply the full data the figure used is calculated by them.

In some cases, where no data is submitted, or is incomplete, we have based a company’s equipment fleet figure on an ICST estimate. In cases of insolvency, acquisition or lack of sufficiently recent information, companies are withdrawn from the table.

While we make great effort to ensure the accuracy of information provided, it cannot be guaranteed and ICST accepts no liability for inaccuracies or omissions.

The IC50 Index will next be updated in the first quarter of 2021. If you think your company should be included, please contact ICST for an application form. Note that tower cranes are not in the main IC50 table here because they appear separately in the special IC Tower Index published in the September issue of ICST.

Similarly, specialized transport equipment is also featured in a separate ranking, the IC Transport50, in the August issue of the magazine. Calls for entries in these tables are also issued and widely publicised like the ones for the IC50. Please look out for them at www.khl.com, in the World Crane Week e-mail newsletter, in the magazine and across social media, including Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram and Twitter.

A pair of Liebherrs from Texas Crane Services in the USA tandem lifting a highway bridge beam over the Guadalupe River in the Texas Hill Countr

A pair of Liebherrs from Texas Crane Services in the USA tandem lifting a highway bridge beam over the Guadalupe River in the Texas Hill Countr

Supporting documents

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