The two Wolff cranes are being used for eight bridge pylons, the highest of which is 160 meters high

The two Wolff cranes are being used for eight bridge pylons, the highest of which is 160 meters high. Several relocations of the cranes, including climbing and tie-ins make the project in the Mosel Va

Porr Deutschland has added two Wolff 603.12 flat top tower cranes to its fleet to work on the construction of a 1,700 metre long bridge in the Mosel Valley, Germany.

The bridge forms part of a new transportation link in Ürzig, Zeltingen, and connecting the Benelux countries and the Rhine-Main region. Porr Deutschland is the main contractor for the construction work. The company is working in joint association with Eiffel Deutschland Stahltechnologie and Eiffage Construction Metallique France. The bridge will be 1,700 metres long and 158 m high.

The two Wolff 603.12 tower cranes are being used to erect eight bridge pylons. Both cranes are fitted on foundation anchors and have a jib radius of 40 m. The models have a capacity of 12 tonnes and a maximum load moment of 224 tonne-metres.

The towers are working on the second pair of pylons. One of the cranes is at its final height of 113.6 m and the second is due to be climbed to a height of 131.6 m. Depending on the height of the pylons, the cranes will rise to a hook height of 163 m, a spokesperson added. The two cranes are expected to move around 35,000 tonnes of concrete and 3,000 tonnes of steel, a spokesperson said.

Throughout the project, the tower cranes will be reassembled three times. Andreas Kahl, Wolffkran managing director, said, “Every assembly and climbing step requires the highest level of concentration and thorough preparation. We are constantly faced with logistical and technical challenges during the entire construction period.”

Olaf Krumbein, Porr Deutschland project manager, said, “Wolffkran takes care of the assembly, service, repairs, consulting, technical support and rents out project-specific components for our cranes. Everything runs smoothly and easily – a must on such a large and complex construction site as this one.”

The bridge is scheduled for completion in 2018. The cranes are due to be on site until the end of 2016.

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