Construction digital twins ‘brought to life’ with Earthcam 4D

A new tool has been created by Earthcam that is said to make it easier for those in construction to view the progress of projects compared to their initial design plans, and make the digital twin process simpler.

Credit: Earthcam website

Built on the Bentley iTwin platform, Earthcam 4D augments Bentley Systems’ Synchro 4D models with high-resolution photos from multiple cameras throughout the jobsite, overlaid in precise alignment. An intuitive time-line allows users to scroll backwards and forwards in time to view live imagery in relation to their 4D models.

Viewers are able to zoom in and out, and the associated live images remain synched. Unique transparency/opacity and model colour adjustments enable new and powerful ways to compare and contrast models with reality over time.

Rich Humphrey, VP of Construction, at Bentley Systems, said, “The partnership between Earthcam and Bentley is bringing construction digital twins to life by simplifying the visual communication of project status to all stakeholders. Now anyone can compare what is happening on the jobsite to what was planned virtually within a simple web viewer powered by Bentley’s iTwin technology.

“By mixing 4D models from Synchro with Earthcam’s reality models, all stakeholders on the project can quickly see the progress of the project, identify issues, and keep the project on time and on budget from anywhere.”

Earthcam 4D will be premiered at Bentley Momentum, the developer showcase for digital twin solutions on January 26th.

Latest News
CTE signs up with Vermeer
Vermeer to become distributor for CTE lifts in southern US states 
What construction law changes will there be across the EU and UK in 2024?
Construction ERP software experts have outlined the legal developments that may be in store for 2024 to help the industry prepare for what lies ahead
South Korea to pump $19 billion into chip sector amid global building frenzy
South Korea has announced that it will pump 26 trillion won (US$19 billion) into its chip manufacturing businesses, as semiconductor firms race to build facilities in ‘all-out warfare’