Vibration Monitoring

25 March 2008

The european union's Physical Agents Vibration Directive (PAD), Which Comes into force on 6 July 2007, requires contractors to keep records of a machine operator's cumulative exposure to vibration.

Sears' VMS System (Vibration Monitoring System), nominated for an Innovation Award at last year's Intermat Exhibition, and on show at Bauma fitted to a Bell ADT, will do just that, according to the company.

In essence a conventional looking seat with the ability to monitor and measure vibration built in, sensors just below the surface measure vibration and display them in real time. The data is also stored on a daily basis, as required by the PAD. VMS can also display an instant ‘reading' of vibration levels via a warning light.

In addition to the monitoring of Whole Body Vibration (WBV), the PAD also sets maximum levels of Hand Arm Vibration (HAV), which Sears' VMS can also be configured to record and store, via a hand or wrist sensor.

The system can be configured to work with a portable data storage device (like a USB drive) personalised for an individual operator. This can be ‘plugged in' to any machine an operator might use on any given day, thereby recording their cumulative vibration exposure.

In theory when an operator has received the maximum daily vibration allowance, their workday must finish (in terms of harmful vibrations received). Using VMS, said a Sears spokesman, allows the contractor and operator to monitor harmful vibrations and plan the working day or week accordingly.

The complete system can be supplied to an OEM for factory fitting or retro-fitted in a ‘simplified' version.

Latest News
New battery storage systems from Aggreko
Batteries offer 40-50% reductions in fuel costs and emissions
Speedy trading update points to growth
UK rental company maintains “positive trading momentum” 
Herc posts upbeat Q2 and H1 2021 results
Planned market expansion supported by strong rental market and rising CapEx