LGMG unveils boom re-design

By Euan Youdale26 November 2020

LGMG PIC01

LGMG’s stand at Bauma China 2020.

LGMG has unveiled a series of newly-designed boom lifts at Bauma China, with larger capacities and platforms.

At the show, which is taking place this week in Shanghai, the manufacturer has also introduced new crawler scissor lifts and truck mounted platforms, along with a range of its existing products.

The AR19J articulating diesel-powered boom lift has a new boom structure, allowing a 20.8m working height and a horizontal outreach of up to 12.1m, with its 1.5m jib, which enhances the working envelope. The model has four-wheel drive and front oscillating axles, which the company said ensured a high level of all terrain performance.

LGMG also launched the T22J and T28J diesel-powered telescopic boom lifts at the show. Their working heights are 24m and 30m, respectively. They are both offer dual capacities of 450kg restricted and 300kg unrestricted. Their gradeability is 45%, complementing four wheel drive and front oscillating axles. LGMG said it will continue to develop boom products to meet market demand.

The company has also demoed its full series of lithium battery optional modules at Bauma China. Based on major research and testing, LGMG’s full range of scissor lifts can now be equipped with lithium batteries, with only the battery and charger needing to be replaced when retro fitted.

“Lithium batteries bring more economic benefits to customers due to their long service life, fast charging, and strong adaptability to extreme environments,” said LGMG. “Lithium-ion batteries are the core power of the future of aerial work platform products and the development trend of the industry”.

 

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