Imer Access launches range of truck mounted platforms

By Murray Pollok06 April 2011

Imer Access launched its truck mounted platform range at the Smopyc show in Spain. Pictured in Zarag

Imer Access launched its truck mounted platform range at the Smopyc show in Spain. Pictured in Zaragoza is the 14.2 m working height P 14 T 9.

Imer Group is adding a rang of seven small truck mounted platforms to its line of self-propelled scissors lifts and booms. The first model - a 14.2 m working height telescopic unit mounted on a 3.5 t Nissan carrier - was introduced at the Smopyc exhibition in Zaragoza, Spain.

Corrado Conti, who specializes in selling Imer Access products, told Access International that the range will cover five straight telescopic models with working heights from 13 m to 21 m and two simple articulated models with 19 m and 23 m working heights. A double articulated 20-21 m model will be made available soon.

The main components of the machines are being built by Imer at its facility close to Siena, Italy, with assembly outsourced to a local factory. In some markets, including Spain and France, the booms will be supplied as kits to be mounted on carriers locally.

Mr Conti said the aim behind the new truck mounts was to expand the range of access equipment offered by Imer; "That´s the philosophy. Imer has the intention to grow in access."

Prices, including the trucks, will vary from around €38000 for the 13 m model to close to €50000 for the largest P 23 unit.

Meanwhile, Mr Conti said that Imer Access has sold 22 scissors and booms to a new Brazilian dealer called Artigers. Ten machines are on their way and a further 12 will be delivered in a month.

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