Meis develops working platform for Bobcat handlers

By Murray Pollok11 November 2009

Meis Baumaschinen has developed a personnel basket that allows Bobcat 14 m and 17 m telehandlers to

Meis Baumaschinen has developed a personnel basket that allows Bobcat 14 m and 17 m telehandlers to be controlled from the cage

German used telehandler specialist Meis Baumaschinen has developed a personnel basket that allows Bobcat 14 m and 17 m telehandlers to be controlled from the cage.

The Boomlader - meaning a combination of aerial boom and telehandler - was designed by the company's owner and managing director, Jürgan Meis.

"The most obvious advantage is that the operator in the working platform no longer has to return the boom to base position in order to move the telehandler to the next operating location", says the company.

"There is no need to return to the cab either. In retracted, but fully lifted position (8 m working height), all functions of the telehandler are completely controlled from the working cage. This also includes the all-important jacking procedure."

Fitted to a 17 m Bobcat T40170, the platform provides a maximum working height of 19.5 and maximum outreach of 13.5 m. The TÜV certified and CE marked platform can be disassembled in minutes using Bobcat's quick-release system. It weighs 590 kg, has a carrying capacity of 320 kg, and is 2.53 m wide in travel mode and extendible up to 4.2 m.

Meis says that "safe and smooth operation" is possible on slopes of up to 4°, and when used with two independently controlled outriggers it can operate in slopes of up to 12°. The company is considering designing similar platforms for other makes of telehandler.

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